Friday, December 9, 2011

Women's Work

**artwork by Tigress83**
Merry Meet,

Each morning I read the Daily Om. You can find their website here: http://www.dailyom.com/   I always love them, but today's I found particularly relevant and inspiring.  We live in an economy where two incomes are almost necessary, unless you are among the lucky ones who can handle things on one income.  The cost of everything has been increasing.  Moms (and Dads) who are just that, a full-time mom or dad are becoming harder and harder to find.  I've also found the respect dwindling for those who chose this life past and I think that it's sad.  While I respect that everyone doesn't have the option to have one parent stay home, I do believe that a stay at home mom or dad should be respected just as much as anyone who goes out in the "field" to work.  I grew up with my mom always home and I am working hard to maintain that lifestyle for my children today.  I work from home, but I am a full-time mom first and foremost.  This enables me to participate in all my children's extra activities, like sports, girl scouts, volunteering at the schools etc.  I've been criticized for it many times being told to go get a "real job." Something that has always bugged me.  However I still choose to walk this path, and do my best to create an income from home so that I may give my children that extra time and those extra opportunities.  Again, for those who don't have the option I completely understand, and I'm not against having two parents that work. I am however for celebrating those stay at home mom's and dad's and recognizing that their jobs are important as well. :))))))))) So if you are a full time mom or dad, be proud of what you do. :)))) You have a very important job in this world.  With that, Daily Om did a wonderful job with this, and I wanted to share what they wrote.


Women's Work

Tending the Hearth


The importance of tending the hearth that nurtures all who bask in its warmth is a beautiful thing.

In the recent past, the term women's work has come to have a derogatory connotation. Women's work encompasses all the domestic chores that have historically been associated only with women—cooking, cleaning, and raising children. Whenever a person is limited to only certain kinds of work in a society, there is a need to break free from that work in order to inhabit a place of choice. However, when we choose to do women's work because we enjoy it, there is nothing degrading about it. There is an honor to it, and when done alone or in a group this work can be truly meaningful and fulfilling because the home is the foundation of security for all who live in it. The importance of tending the hearth that nurtures all who bask in its warmth cannot be overstated.

In addition to being essential to the functioning of the world, women's work offers creative fulfillment, intimate interaction, and personal satisfaction. The more we become aware of the significance of this realm of labor, the more fulfilling it will be to those who do the work and those who benefit from it. A well-set table and a delicious, healthy meal can heal us on multiple levels. Clean, crisp sheets on a bed allow us to enter a deep slumber, inspiring a sense of safety and trust. Our mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual health all rest upon the smooth functioning of our homes.

The gift of women's work, which still often comes from the hands of women, now also comes from fathers, husbands, and hired help. Whatever the source, our sincere gratitude upon receiving these treasures reminds us of the profound value of what is traditionally known as women's work. The more we acknowledge the tremendous importance of this work, the more we are able to do it with a sense of pride, never feeling for a moment that our efforts are less significant or meaningful than those working outside the home—on the contrary, it is this work that makes all other work possible.


http://www.dailyom.com/articles/2011/31247.html




1 comment:

  1. Totally agree with you there. Everybody should choose the lifestyle they feel is right or feel they need to adopt to meet their demands. Two of my sisters are SAHMs (one by choice, the other because the foster children agency demands it). The foster mum has used the time spent at home to start her carreer as a photographer (she has had exhibitions and had pictures printed in books and such). My third sister had to work at times, jsut as our mother did, to bring home enough money for food. My sister-in-law wanted to be a SAHM, but after a year cannot wait to get back into her old job, and that is great, too, because I know she will still do her best to care for their boy. And I really do not know what I will do - I would love to stay at home with the kids, but I cannot imagine not being a translator/writer, and that is something I may take up at the home office... well, we will see.

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